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Lymphangiogenesis and hemangiogenesis: Potential targets for therapy

Authors

  • Marlys H. Witte MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Surgery, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona
    • Professor of Surgery and Director, University of Arizona College of Medicine, 1501 N. Campbell Avenue, Room 4406, PO Box 245200, Tucson, AZ 85724-5200. Fax: 520-626-0822.
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    • Professor of Surgery and Director of Student Research Programs.

  • Michael T. Dellinger PhD,

    1. Department of Surgery, Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas
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    • Post-Doctoral Researcher.

  • Donald M. McDonald MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Anatomy, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California
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    • Professor of Anatomy.

  • S. David Nathanson MD,

    1. Department of Surgery, Wayne State Medical School, Henry Ford Health Center, Detroit, Michigan
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    • Professor of Surgery.

  • Francesco M. Boccardo MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Surgery, San Martino Hospital, University of Genoa, Genova, Italy
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    • Professor of Surgery and Microsurgery.

  • Corradino C.C. Campisi MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Surgery, San Martino Hospital, University of Genoa, Genova, Italy
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    • Full Professor of General Surgery.

  • Jonathan P. Sleeman PhD,

    1. Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
    2. Karlsruhe Institut für Toxikologie und Genetik, Karlsruhe, Germany
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    • Professor of Microvascular Biology and Pathobiology.

  • Jeffrey E. Gershenwald MD, FACS

    1. Department of Surgical Oncology and Cancer Biology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
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    • Professor of Surgery and Cancer Biology.


Abstract

This review updates historical background from century-old observations on embryonic lymphatic system development through current understanding of the molecular basis of lymphvasculogenesis/lymphangiogenesis (“molecular lymphology”), highlighting similarities and differences with analogous blood vasculature processes. Topics covered include molecular mechanisms in lymphatic development, structural adaptations of the lymphatic vasculature to particulate and cellular transport and trafficking, lymphogenous route of clinical cancer spread, preservation of delineated lymphatic pathways during cancer operations, and anti-lymphangiogenesis in cancer therapy. J. Surg. Oncol. 2011;103:489–500. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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