Guidelines for lymphoscintigraphy and F18 FDG PET scans in Melanoma

Authors

  • Roger F. Uren MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    2. Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Ultrasound, Newtown, NSW, Australia
    • Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Ultrasound, Suite 206 RPAH Medical Centre, 100 Carillon Ave, Newtown, NSW 2042, Australia. Fax: 612-95505293===

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    • Clinical Professor of Medicine.

  • Robert Howman-Giles MD,

    1. Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    2. Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Ultrasound, Newtown, NSW, Australia
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    • Clinical Professor of Medicine.

  • David Chung MBBS,

    1. Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Ultrasound, Newtown, NSW, Australia
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  • John F. Thompson MD

    1. Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    2. Melanoma Institute Australia, North Sydney, NSW, Australia
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    • Professor of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology.


Abstract

Melanoma has a high potential to develop metastases. Accurate staging is essential for appropriate management. Sentinel node (SN) status is a powerful prognostic factor in early stage melanoma. Staging is assisted by SN biopsy after lymphoscintigraphy to locate all true SNs prior to biopsy. PET using F18-FDG can detect metastases and is used to restage patients with AJCC Stages III and IV disease before planning surgery with curative intent. J. Surg. Oncol. 2011; 104:405–419. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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