A comparative study of breast cancer in the black and white populations of two inner-city hospitals

Authors

  • Nirmal K. Mittra MD, MS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey
    • Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and Dentistry, 100 Bergen Street, Room G506, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 07107
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  • Benjamin F. Rush Jr MD, FACS,

    1. Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey
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  • E. Verner MD

    1. Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey
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Abstract

A comparative study of breast cancer was made among black and white populations admitted to two inner-city hospitals from 1971 through 1976, inclusive. There were 306 patients in the study group of which 162 were black and 144 were white. Age, sex, color, duration of illness, different quadrants of breast involved, staging of cancer, histological diagnosis, treatment given, and incidence of recurrence were studied in each group. A statistically higher incidence of cancer of the breast was found among the black patients in the groups aged 30–50 years and 70–80 years, as compared to the white population. All other parameters studied showed no statistical differences.

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