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Lippia origanoides chemotype differentiation based on essential oil GC-MS and principal component analysis

Authors

  • Elena E. Stashenko,

    Corresponding author
    1. Chromatography Laboratory, Research Center of Excellence, CENIVAM, Industrial University of Santander, Bucaramanga, Colombia
    • Chromatography Laboratory, CENIVAM, Building 45, UIS, Carrera 27, Calle 9, Bucaramanga, Colombia Fax: +57-7-6358210
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  • Jairo R. Martínez,

    1. Chromatography Laboratory, Research Center of Excellence, CENIVAM, Industrial University of Santander, Bucaramanga, Colombia
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  • Carlos A. Ruíz,

    1. Chromatography Laboratory, Research Center of Excellence, CENIVAM, Industrial University of Santander, Bucaramanga, Colombia
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  • Ginna Arias,

    1. Chromatography Laboratory, Research Center of Excellence, CENIVAM, Industrial University of Santander, Bucaramanga, Colombia
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  • Camilo Durán,

    1. Chromatography Laboratory, Research Center of Excellence, CENIVAM, Industrial University of Santander, Bucaramanga, Colombia
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  • William Salgar,

    1. Chromatography Laboratory, Research Center of Excellence, CENIVAM, Industrial University of Santander, Bucaramanga, Colombia
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  • Mónica Cala

    1. Chromatography Laboratory, Research Center of Excellence, CENIVAM, Industrial University of Santander, Bucaramanga, Colombia
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Abstract

Chromatographic (GC/flame ionization detection, GC/MS) and statistical analyses were applied to the study of essential oils and extracts obtained from flowers, leaves, and stems of Lippia origanoides plants, growing wild in different Colombian regions. Retention indices, mass spectra, and standard substances were used in the identification of 139 substances detected in these essential oils and extracts. Principal component analysis allowed L. origanoides classification into three chemotypes, characterized according to their essential oil major components. α- and β-phellandrenes, p-cymene, and limonene distinguished chemotype A; carvacrol and thymol were the distinctive major components of chemotypes B and C, respectively. Pinocembrin (5,7-dihydroxyflavanone) was found in L. origanoides chemotype A supercritical fluid (CO2) extract at a concentration of 0.83±0.03 mg/g of dry plant material, which makes this plant an interesting source of an important bioactive flavanone with diverse potential applications in cosmetic, food, and pharmaceutical products.

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