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Beyond the Work-to-Leisure Conflict: A High Road through Social Support for Tourism Employees

Authors

  • Jo-Hui Lin,

    1. Graduate Institute of Recreation, Tourism, and Hospitality Management, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan
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  • Jehn-Yih Wong,

    1. Department of Business Administration, Ming Chuan University, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Ching-Hua Ho

    Corresponding author
    1. Graduate Institute of Travel and Tourism Management, National Kaohsiung University of Hospitality and Tourism, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
    • Correspondence to: Ching-hua Ho, PhD, Graduate Institute of Travel and Tourism Management, National Kaohsiung University of Hospitality and Tourism, No.1, Songhe Rd., Xiaogang Dist., Kaohsiung City, 812 Taiwan.

      E-mail: chh436@mail.nkuht.edu.tw

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ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to test the direct and moderating effects of job strain variables on the Job Demand–Control–Support model. A total of 422 tourism employees completed a questionnaire. Hierarchical and moderated regression models were employed to test the proposed relationships between job strain variables and work-to-leisure conflict. Results indicated that job demands had a positive relationship with work-to-leisure conflict, whereas the schedule flexibility and the time-off flexibility were negatively related to work-to-leisure conflict. Results also found that supervisor support could moderate the influence of tourism employees' job demands on work-to-leisure conflict. Implications of stress management and job design for human resource department are discussed. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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