Different emotional memory consolidation in cancer survivors with and those without a history of intrusive recollection

Authors

  • Mitsue Nagamine,

    1. Division of Adult Mental Health, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo and Psycho-Oncology Division, Research Center for Innovative Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan
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  • Yutaka Matsuoka,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Adult Mental Health, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo and Psycho-Oncology Division, Research Center for Innovative Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan
    • Division of Adult Mental Health, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, 4-1-1 Ogawahigashi-cho, Kodaira, Tokyo, 187-8553 Japan
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  • Etsuro Mori,

    1. Department of Behavioral Neurology and Cognitive Neuroscience, Tohoku University, Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan
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  • Shigeru Imoto,

    1. Department of Breast Surgery, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Yoshiharu Kim,

    1. Division of Adult Mental Health, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Yosuke Uchitomi

    1. Division of Breast Surgery, National Cancer Center Hospital East Kashiwa, and Psycho-Oncology Division, Research Center for Innovative Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan
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Abstract

The study examined emotional memory consolidation among cancer survivors with and without a history of intrusive recollection (IR). Eleven cancer survivors with a history of IR (IR+), 20 cancer survivors without a history of IR (IR−), and 20 healthy women were tested for emotional memory. The participants viewed emotionally arousing slides, and one week later, they were asked to return to the laboratory and were given an unexpected memory test to examine their retention of emotional memory. Only the IR− group did not show any significant enhancement in emotional memory, compared to neutral memory. These findings are discussed in light of possible inhibitory mechanisms of emotional memory consolidation.

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