Treatment considerations for clinicians in applying evidence-based practice to complex presentations in child trauma

Authors

  • Lisa Amaya-Jackson,

    Corresponding author
    1. National Center for Child Traumatic Stress & Center for Child and Family Health, Durham, NC
    • National Center for Child Traumatic Stress & Center for Child and Family Health, Durham, NC, Duke Box 3438, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710
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  • Ruth R. DeRosa

    1. Department of Psychiatry, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY
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  • A preliminary version of this article was presented by the first author at the Annual Meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies in Hollywood, California, November 2006.

Abstract

Professionals in the child trauma field, eager to bring best practices to children and their families who have suffered from traumatic life events, have developed a number of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) and promising practices available for adoption and implementation into community practice. Clinicians and researchers alike have raised questions about “if, when, and how” these EBTs can be applied to some of the more complex trauma presentations seen in real world practice. The authors take an evidence-based practice approach, including critical appraisal of clients' unique needs and preferences, utilizing applicable trauma treatment core components and current EBTs, and emphasizing monitoring strategies of client progress, particularly when needing to adapt EBTs for select clients.

Ancillary