Acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder in parents of injured children

Authors

  • Nancy Kassam-Adams,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Injury Research and Prevention, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
    • Center for Injury Research and Prevention, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 3535 Market Street, Suite 1150, Philadelphia, PA 19104
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  • Courtney Landau Fleisher,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, La Rabida Children's Hospital and University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago IL
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  • Flaura Koplin Winston

    1. Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
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  • This work was supported by a grant from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (#R40 MC 00138).

Abstract

Acute stress disorder (ASD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were examined in 334 parents of children with traffic-related injuries. In the first month after their child's injury, 12% of parents had ASD and another 25% had partial ASD. Among 251 parents assessed again approximately 6 months postinjury, 8% had PTSD and another 7% had partial PTSD. The ASD and PTSD severity were associated (r = .54), but ASD status was not a sensitive predictor of later PTSD. Independent predictors of ASD severity included prior trauma exposure, peritrauma exposure and perceptions of the child's pain and life threat, and child ASD severity. Independent predictors of PTSD severity included prior trauma exposure, parent ASD severity, and parent-rated child physical health at follow-up.

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