Incapacitated, forcible, and drug/alcohol-facilitated rape in relation to binge drinking, marijuana use, and illicit drug use: A national survey

Authors

  • Jenna L. McCauley,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
    • National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, 67 President Street, MSC 861, Medical University of South Carolina; Charleston, SC 29425
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  • Kenneth J. Ruggiero,

    1. Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, and the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC
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  • Heidi S. Resnick,

    1. Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
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  • Dean G. Kilpatrick

    1. Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
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  • This research was supported by National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Grant #2005-WG-BX-0006 (PI: Dean G. Kilpatrick, Ph.D.).

    Views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of NIJ.

Abstract

This study examined the relation between rape and substance use problems as a function of three legally recognized forms of rape: forcible, incapacitated, and drug/alcohol facilitated rape. Data were collected via structured telephone interview within a national household sample of U.S. women aged 18–34 years (n = 1,998). Lifetime experience of incapacitated rape was associated with increased odds of past-year binge drinking, marijuana use, and illicit drug use. Lifetime history of forcible rape and drug/alcohol facilitated rape were associated with increased odds of marijuana and illicit drug use. Findings highlight the importance of including incapacitated and drug/alcohol facilitated rape in trauma history assessments, particularly among substance abusing populations, and have implications for secondary prevention and treatment of women with victimization histories.

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