The role of protective self-cognitions in the relationship between childhood trauma and later resource loss

Authors

  • Kristen H. Walter,

    Corresponding author
    1. Kent State University and Cincinnati VA Medical Center
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Psychology, Kent State University, and Cincinnati VA Medical Center
    • Cincinnati VA Medical Center, 3200 Vine Street, Mental Health Care Line A926, Cincinnati, Ohio 45220
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Katie J. Horsey,

    1. Kent State University
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Psychology, Kent State University
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Patrick A. Palmieri,

    1. Center for the Treatment and Study of Traumatic Stress
    Current affiliation:
    1. Center for the Treatment and Study of Traumatic Stress, Summa Health System, Akron
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stevan E. Hobfoll

    1. Rush University Medical Center
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Behavioral Sciences, Rush University Medical Center
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This research was supported by Grant 5 RO1 MHO45669 National Institute of Health, NIMH Office of AIDS Research. Special thanks to Dr. Kristin Mickelson who provided helpful suggestions and feedback on the manuscript prior to submission.

Abstract

The authors examined a prospective model investigating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and protective self-cognitions (self-esteem and self-efficacy) with later resource loss among 402 inner-city women who experienced childhood abuse. They predicted that women with PTSD may fail to develop or sustain protective self-cognitions that could protect against future stress. Results from the hypothesized model suggest that child abuse was associated with greater PTSD symptoms and later resource loss. PTSD symptoms were also related to protective self-cognitions, which, in turn, were associated with less resource loss. The authors also examined an alternative model exploring the relationship between resource loss and later PTSD symptoms. Findings allude to the relationship of risk and resiliency variables among women with childhood trauma histories.

Ancillary