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Consistency of retrospective reports of peritraumatic responses and their relation to PTSD diagnostic status

Authors

  • Annie-Claude David,

    1. Université du Québec à Montréal and Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montréal
    Current affiliation:
    1. Annie-Claude David, Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal and Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montréal
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  • Vivian Akerib,

    1. Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montréal
    Current affiliation:
    1. Annie-Claude David, Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal and Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montréal
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  • Louise Gaston,

    1. Traumatys Inc
    Current affiliation:
    1. Vivian Akerib, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montréal
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  • Alain Brunet

    Corresponding author
    1. Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montréal and McGill University
    Current affiliation:
    1. Louise Gaston, Traumatys Inc.; Alain Brunet, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montréal and Department of Psychiatry, McGill University
    • 6875 LaSalle Boulevard, Montréal, Québec, H4H 1R3, Canada
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  • This work was funded by grants from the Fonds de la recherche en santé du Québec (FRSQ), the Conseil Québécois en recherche sociale (CQRS), and the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) to the senior author.

Abstract

Few studies have examined whether trauma-exposed individuals are consistent in their retrospective reports of how they reacted at the time of trauma exposure, and whether this phenomenon has any implications at the diagnostic level. In a series of three longitudinal studies (N = 113) with different timeframes, the authors prospectively investigated the consistency of peritraumatic response scores as a function of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic status. Across the three studies, consistency of scores was better among individuals who either did not develop PTSD or who remitted from it than among those whose PTSD did not remit. These results are consistent with the literature suggesting that compromised memory processes are related to sustained PTSD.

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