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Traumatic stress, affect dysregulation, and dysfunctional avoidance: A structural equation model

Authors

  • John Briere,

    Corresponding author
    1. Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
    • Psychological Trauma Program, 2010 Zonal Ave., 1P51, Los Angeles, CA 90033
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  • Monica Hodges,

    1. Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles and California State University, Long Beach
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and Department of Psychology, California State University, Long Beach
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  • Natacha Godbout

    1. Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
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  • Monica Hodges is now at Department of Psychology, California State University, Long Beach, CA.

Abstract

The multivariate relationship between interpersonal trauma, posttraumatic stress, affect dysregulation, and various avoidance behaviors was examined in a sample of 418 trauma-exposed participants from the general population. Structural equation modeling indicated that (a) suicidality, substance abuse, dissociation, and problematic activities such as self-injury and dysfunctional sexual behaviors were all indicators of a robust latent variable, named dysfunctional avoidance, (b) accumulated exposure to various types of interpersonal trauma was associated with this avoidance factor, and (c) the relationship between trauma and dysfunctional avoidance was independently mediated by both posttraumatic stress and diminished affect regulation capacity.

Traditional and Simplified Chinese Abstracts by AsianSTSS

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