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Lucid dreaming and resilience in the face of exposure to terrorism

Authors

  • Nirit Soffer-Dudek,

    Corresponding author
    1. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Psychology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev; Golan Shahar, Department of Psychology, Ben-Gurion University and Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine.
    • Department of Psychology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel.
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  • Reut Wertheim,

    Corresponding author
    1. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Psychology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev; Golan Shahar, Department of Psychology, Ben-Gurion University and Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine.
    • Department of Psychology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel.
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  • Golan Shahar

    1. Ben-Gurion University and Yale University School of Medicine
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Psychology, Ben-Gurion University and Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine.
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  • The first two authors share senior authorship on this manuscript, with names listed alphabetically.

Abstract

The relationship between resilience and lucid dreams, which involves awareness of the experience of dreaming, was examined in 79 Israeli young adults. Psychological distress and lucid dreams 3 years prior to exposure to terrorism, and exposure levels and psychological distress 1 week following exposure, were assessed. Both indirect exposure through media and perceived stress predicted an increase in distress during the 3-year interval under low, but not high, levels of lucid dreams. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

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