Cognitive–behavioral conjoint therapy for PTSD: Pilot results from a community sample

Authors

  • Candice M. Monson,

    Corresponding author
    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Boston University School of Medicine, Ryerson University
    Current affiliation:
    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Women's Health Sciences Division; Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry; Ryerson University, Department of Psychology Ryerson University
    • Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3 Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Steffany J. Fredman,

    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Boston University School of Medicine
    Current affiliation:
    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder; Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kathryn C. Adair,

    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
    Current affiliation:
    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Women's Health Sciences Division
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Susan P. Stevens,

    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Dartmouth Medical School
    Current affiliation:
    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Executive Division; Dartmouth Medical School, Department of Psychiatry
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Patricia A. Resick,

    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Boston University School of Medicine
    Current affiliation:
    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Women's Health Sciences Division; Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Paula P. Schnurr,

    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Dartmouth Medical School
    Current affiliation:
    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Executive Division; Dartmouth Medical School, Department of Psychiatry
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Helen Z. MacDonald,

    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Boston University School of Medicine
    Current affiliation:
    1. A National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Behavioral Science Division; Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Alexandra Macdonald

    1. VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Boston University School of Medicine
    Current affiliation:
    1. A National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Behavioral Science Division; Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
    Search for more papers by this author

  • The study was supported by a National Institute of Mental Health grant to the first author (5R34MH076813).

Abstract

Seven couples participated in an uncontrolled trial of cognitive–behavioral conjoint therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Among the 6 couples who completed treatment, 5 of the patients no longer met criteria for PTSD and there were across-treatment effect size improvements in patients' total PTSD symptoms according to independent clinician assessment, patient report, and partner report (d = 1.32–1.69). Three of the 4 couples relationally distressed at pretreatment were satisfied at posttreatment. Partners reported statistically significant and large effect size improvements in relationship satisfaction; patients reported nonsignificant moderate to large improvements in relationship satisfaction. Patients also reported nonsignificant, but large effect size improvements in depression and state anger symptoms. Future directions for research and treatment of traumatized individuals and close others are offered.

Traditional and Simplified Chinese Abstracts by AsianSTSS

original image
original image

Ancillary