Pathways to suicidal behavior in posttraumatic stress disorder*

Authors

  • Maria Panagioti,

    1. University of Manchester
    Current affiliation:
    1. School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Patricia A. Gooding,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Manchester
    Current affiliation:
    1. School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford
    • Division of Psychology, Coupland Building 1, Oxford Road, University of Manchester, M13 9PL, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Graham Dunn,

    1. University of Manchester
    Current affiliation:
    1. School of Community Based Medicine, University of Manchester
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Nicholas Tarrier

    1. University of Manchester
    Current affiliation:
    1. School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester.
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Nicholas Tarrier is now at the Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London.


  • *

    This article was edited by the Journal's previous Editor, Paula Schnurr.

  • We would like to thank Peter Taylor for comments on an earlier version of this paper. The work presented in the current manuscript is part of the PhD study of the first author. We would also like to acknowledge funding from a British Academy small grant entitled, “Suicide in PTSD,'' which supported this work.

Abstract

This study investigated paths to suicidal behavior in 94 civilian participants with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Two statistical modeling programs, TETRAD II version 2.1 and Mplus 5.21 were used to construct a working model of suicide in PTSD. Two paths to suicidal behavior were identified. In the first path, suicidal behavior was directly associated with greater life impairment, which in turn was associated with poorer occupational and social functioning. In the second path, suicidal behavior was directly associated with depressive symptoms, which in turn were associated with more severe PTSD symptoms. Psychotropic medication, employment status, and threat to life further contributed to the model. The findings suggest that negative perceptions of functional impairment and depression are strongly associated with suicidal behavior in PTSD.

Traditional and Simplified Chinese Abstracts by AsianSTSS

original image
original image

Ancillary