Exploring the efficacy of a residential treatment program incorporating cognitive processing therapy-cognitive for veterans with PTSD and traumatic brain injury

Authors

  • Kathleen M. Chard,

    Corresponding author
    1. Cincinnati VA Medical Center and University of Cincinnati
    Current affiliation:
    1. PTSD and Anxiety Disorders Division, Cincinnati VA Medical Center, and Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
    • Cincinnati VA Medical Center, PTSD and Anxiety Disorders Division, 3200 Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45220
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  • Jeremiah A. Schumm,

    1. Cincinnati VA Medical Center and University of Cincinnati
    Current affiliation:
    1. PTSD and Anxiety Disorders Division, Cincinnati VA Medical Center, and Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
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  • Susan M. McIlvain,

    1. Cincinnati VA Medical Center
    Current affiliation:
    1. PTSD and Anxiety Disorders Division, Cincinnati VA Medical Center, and Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
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  • Gregory W. Bailey,

    1. Cincinnati VA Medical Center
    Current affiliation:
    1. PTSD and Anxiety Disorders Division, Cincinnati VA Medical Center
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  • R. Bruce Parkinson

    1. Cincinnati VA Medical Center
    Current affiliation:
    1. PTSD and Anxiety Disorders Division, Cincinnati VA Medical Center
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  • This article was edited by the journal's previous editor, Paula P. Schnurr.

  • The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or reflecting the views of the United States Government or Department of Veterans Affairs.

Abstract

As the numbers of military personnel participating in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq continue to grow, the percentage of individuals who return with both a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) also increases. Although there appears to be significant overlap in the symptoms resulting from PTSD and TBI, the best course of treatment remains an area of controversy. The authors present initial findings from a Veterans Administration residential program for comorbid PTSD and TBI. Forty-two participants completed a program comprising psychoeducational groups and cognitive skill building that was augmented with a modification of standard cognitive processing therapy. The results suggest that residential programs that incorporate this form of cognitive therapy can anticipate meaningful participation from patients, and that it may be an effective approach to treat PTSD in individuals with a history of TBI.

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