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Relationship of Trauma Symptoms to Amygdala-Based Functional Brain Changes in Adolescents

Authors

  • Kate B. Nooner,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, North Carolina, USA
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  • Maarten Mennes,

    1. Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    2. Phyllis Green and Randolph Cōwen Institute for Pediatric Neuroscience, New York University Child Study Center, Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
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  • Shaquanna Brown,

    1. Department of Medical Physics, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, New York, USA
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  • F. Xavier Castellanos,

    1. Phyllis Green and Randolph Cōwen Institute for Pediatric Neuroscience, New York University Child Study Center, Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
    2. Department of Medical Physics, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, New York, USA
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  • Bennett Leventhal,

    1. Department of Medical Physics, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, New York, USA
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  • Michael P. Milham,

    1. Department of Medical Physics, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, New York, USA
    2. Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, New York, USA
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  • Stanley J. Colcombe

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medical Physics, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, New York, USA
    • Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Stanley J. Colcombe, Department of Medical Physics, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, 140 Old Orangeburg Road, Orangeburg, NY, 10962. E-mail: scolcombe@nki.rfmh.org

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  • Thank you Nathan Kline Institute outpatient and imaging staff.

Abstract

In this pilot study, amygdala connectivity related to trauma symptoms was explored using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) in 23 healthy adolescents ages 13–17 years with no psychiatric diagnoses. Adolescents completed a self-report trauma symptom checklist and a R-fMRI scan. We examined the relationship of trauma symptoms to resting-state functional connectivity of the amygdala. Increasing self-report of trauma symptoms by adolescents was associated with increasing functional connectivity with the right amygdala and a local limbic cluster and decreasing functional connectivity with the amygdala and a long-range frontoparietal cluster to the left amygdala, which can be a hallmark of immaturity. These pilot findings in adolescents provide preliminary evidence that even mild trauma symptoms can be linked to the configuration of brain networks associated with the amygdala.

Traditional and Simplified Chinese Abstracts by AsianSTSS

標題:青少年中創傷症狀與杏仁體相關腦功能變化的關係。

撮要:本先導研究在23名13至17歲健康及沒有精神病的青少年中進行靜態功能性磁力共振造影(R-fMRI),探討與創傷症狀相關的杏仁體連通性。青少年必須完成一個R-fMRI掃描及填寫一份自我報告創傷症狀清單。我們會檢視創傷症狀與杏仁體靜態功能連通性的關係。青少年增加自我報告創傷症狀與1)右杏仁體及一個局部邊緣系統羣集的加強功能性連通,和2)杏仁體及長距額頂葉至左杏仁體羣集的減弱功能性連通相關,而這些都標誌着腦部的未成熟情況。本青少年先導研究成果提供初步證據,即輕微創傷症狀可能與杏仁體相連腦部網絡配置有關。

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