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Role of vortices in voice production: Normal versus asymmetric tension

Authors

  • Sid Khosla MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.
    • Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, 231 Albert B. Sabin Way, Cincinnati, Ohio, 45267
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  • Shanmugam Murugappan PhD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.
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  • Randal Paniello MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.
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  • Jun Ying PhD,

    1. Institute for the Study of Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.
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  • Ephraim Gutmark PhD

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.
    2. Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.
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  • This study was performed in accordance with the PHS Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, and the Animal Welfare Act (7 U.S.C. et seq.); the animal use protocol was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) of the University of Cincinnati, and supported by grant 5K08DC005421 from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.

Abstract

Objectives:

Decreasing the closing speed of the vocal folds can reduce loudness and energy in the higher frequency harmonics, resulting in reduced voice quality. Our aim was to study the correlation between higher frequencies and the intraglottal vorticity (which contributes to rapid closing by producing transient negative intraglottal pressures).

Methods:

Using six excised canine larynges (three with symmetric and three with asymmetric, periodic vocal fold motion), intraglottal vorticity was calculated from 2D velocity fields measured using particle imaging velocimetry.

Results:

There is a strong correlation between intraglottal vorticity and acoustic energy in the higher frequencies; in periodic asymmetric motion, the vorticity and higher frequencies are both reduced.

Conclusions:

For unilateral vocal fold paralysis, these findings suggest one reason why periodic, asymmetric motion, may produce an abnormal voice. Further study will help determine when and why reinnervation, as opposed to medialization, may result in better voice quality. Laryngoscope, 119:216–221, 2009

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