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Efficacy of the bone-anchored hearing aid for single-sided deafness§

Authors

  • Christopher J. Linstrom MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, New York, U.S.A.
    2. Ear Institute, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York; Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, U.S.A.
    3. AuD Program of the Health Sciences Doctoral Programs, Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, New York, U.S.A.
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  • Carol A. Silverman PhD, MPH,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, New York, U.S.A.
    2. Hearing and Balance Center, New York, U.S.A.
    3. Ear Institute, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York; Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, U.S.A.
    4. AuD Program of the Health Sciences Doctoral Programs, Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, New York, U.S.A.
    5. Communication Sciences Program, Hunter College, CUNY, New York, New York, U.S.A.
    6. PhD Program in Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, New York, U.S.A.
    • Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, (Suite 2D, Resident Bldg), New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, 310 East 14th Street, New York, NY 10003
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  • Guo-Pei Yu PhD

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, New York, U.S.A.
    2. Biostatistics and Epidemiology Service of the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York, U.S.A.
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  • Poster session presented at the Annual Combined Otolaryngology Spring Meetings, San Diego, California, U.S.A., April 26–29, 2007.

  • This research was performed at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary.

  • §

    This material is based on work supported by the Jacob and Valeria Langeloth Foundation, New York, New York, U.S.A.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

The aim was to examine short- and long-term efficacy of the bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) on adults with single-sided deafness.

Study Design:

Prospective investigation.

Methods:

The outcome measures included the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT), Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB), and Single-Sided Deafness Questionnaire (SSD). The BAHA group comprised seven adults with single-sided deafness and the control group comprised 20 adults with essentially normal-hearing sensitivity, bilaterally. The outcome measures were administered in the unaided, directional BAHA, and omnidirectional BAHA conditions after 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months of BAHA use. A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) model was used to evaluate the data (for the SSD, a nonparametric analog of ANOVA was employed).

Results:

None of the factors (time, HINT condition, amplification status) or their interactions were significant predictors of change in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) from baseline over time on the HINT. The mean SNR (non–baseline-subtracted) was significantly lower in the directional BAHA versus the unaided status and in the omnidirectional BAHA versus the unaided status, but only under the noise in front, speech lateralized to the bad ear HINT condition. Significant short- and long-term BAHA benefit was observed on the APHAB (all subscales except Aversiveness) and SSD (all questionnaire items).

Conclusions:

Our results show short- and long-term efficacy for the BAHA in adults with single-sided deafness for recognition of speech in noise (noise in front, speech lateralized to the bad ear) and on subjective measures of benefit. Laryngoscope, 2009

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