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Correlation between SN-5 and computed tomography in children with chronic rhinosinusitis

Authors

  • Andrew M. Terrell MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, West Virginia, U.S.A.
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  • Hassan H. Ramadan MD, MSc, FACS

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, West Virginia, U.S.A.
    • WVU Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Room 2222 Health Science Center South, PO Box 9200, Morgantown, WV 26506-9200
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  • Presented at the Southern Section Triological Meeting, Bonita Springs, Florida, U.S.A., January 9–11, 2009.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

Symptom score questionnaires for evaluation of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in adults does not correlate with computed tomography (CT) scan scores of paranasal sinuses. The SN-5 is a validated symptom score questionnaire for the evaluation of CRS in children. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the correlation of the SN-5 with the CT score in children.

Study Design:

Retrospective review of prospectively collected data.

Methods:

Thirty-two children between the ages of 2 years and 12 years were seen prospectively for symptoms of CRS. The mean age was 7.7 years (range, 3.6–11.5; SD = 2.4). The caretakers completed the SN-5 during their visit when a CT scan of the paranasal sinuses was obtained.

Results:

The mean SN-5 score was 4.1 (SD = 1.03) and the mean Lund-Mackay CT score was 6.8 (SD = 4.3). There was a significant correlation between the SN-5 score and Lund-MacKay CT score (ρ = 0.68; P < .0001) for all children in the study. Twelve (38%) children had asthma, and for those children the correlation was poorer and did not reach statistical significance (ρ = 0 .57; P = .057). For nonasthmatics the correlation was stronger (ρ = 0.73; P = .0003).

Conclusions:

Symptom score questionnaire (SN-5) correlated to the disease severity as measured by the Lund-MacKay CT scan score. This is different from what has been found in adults. These findings have positive implications for the follow-up of treatment of CRS in children because the frequent use of CT scans in children is discouraged due to concern for radiation exposure. Laryngoscope, 2009

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