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Solitary fibrous tumor of the thyroid gland

Authors

  • Tarik Y. Farrag MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.
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  • Shien Micchelli MD,

    1. Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.
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  • Ralph P. Tufano MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.
    • Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Division of Head and Neck Cancer Surgery, 601 N Caroline Street, 6th floor, Room 6242, Baltimore, MD, 21287-0910
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  • None of the authors has any financial conflict of interest to disclose.

Abstract

We report a case of solitary fibrous tumor of the thyroid gland in a 51-year-old man with pre-existing right recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis from a congenital tracheoesophageal fistula repair as an infant. The left thyroid lobe was enlarged and soft. Fine needle aspiration biopsy via ultrasound guidance demonstrated a hypercellular aspirate composed of spindle cells with bland nuclear morphology. Given this histomorphology and immunohistochemical profile, the diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumor was considered and confirmed following left thyroid lobectomy. Laryngoscope, 2009

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