Calcium hydroxylapatite injection laryngoplasty for the treatment of presbylaryngis: Long-term results

Authors

  • Tack-Kyun Kwon MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
    2. Research Center for Sensory Organs, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Soo-Youn An MD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Jae-Cheul Ahn MD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Kwang Hyun Kim MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Myung-Whun Sung MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
    • Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, 10th Floor, Seoul National University Hospital, 28 Yongon-Dong, Chongno-Gu, Seoul 110-744, South Korea
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  • Presented at the 130th Annual Meeting of the American Laryngological Association Combined Otolaryngological Spring Meeting, Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A., May 28–29, 2009.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

Presbylaryngis is a normal part of the aging process, but many people visit hospitals with communication difficulties. The authors evaluated the efficacy of calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA) injection laryngoplasty in patients with presbylaryngis.

Study Design:

Retrospective review.

Methods:

Thirty-three patients with diagnosed presbylaryngis were administered a CaHA injection, and 17 of these patients without other vocal pathologies were included in the analysis. All 17 were male (mean age 65.9 years), mean follow-up duration was 335 days, and all injections were performed through the cricothyroid membrane under local anesthesia in a clinic.

Results:

Subjective ratings, perceptual ratings, maximum phonation time, and closed quotients significantly improved after injection, and these improvements persisted without significant change for over 12 months. No major complications were encountered except for transient hematoma, pain, and a foreign body sensation.

Conclusions:

The authors conclude that CaHA injection laryngoplasty offers an effective and safe means of treating presbylaryngis. Laryngoscope, 2010

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