Isolated laryngeal myokymia: Diagnosis and treatment

Authors

  • Jacob Sedgh MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh Voice Center, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.
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  • Melissa M. Statham MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh Voice Center, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.
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  • Michael C. Munin MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh Voice Center, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.
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  • George Small MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh Voice Center, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.
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  • Clark A. Rosen MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh Voice Center, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.
    • University of Pittsburgh Voice Center, UPMC Mercy, Bldg B-11500, 1400 Locust Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15219
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  • The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Myokymia is an uncommon neuromuscular disorder that rarely affects the human larynx. No previous reports of isolated laryngeal myokymia are present in the literature, and as such, established treatment protocols are lacking. We report the first case of isolated laryngeal myokymia in a 48-year-old woman with no other neurological findings, and our successful results in initial treatment and maintenance therapy with focal intralaryngeal injections of botulinum toxin A. Laryngoscope, 2010

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