Interspecies comparison of mucosal wave properties using high-speed digital imaging

Authors

  • Michael F. Regner,

    1. Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A
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  • Mark J. Robitaille,

    1. Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A
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  • Jack J. Jiang MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A
    • 5745 Medical Science Center, 1300 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706
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  • This work was supported by National Institutes of Health grant No. R01 DC005522-09 from the Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The authors have no other funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

The purpose of this study was to compare the vocal fold vibratory characteristics of ex vivo bovine, canine, ovine, and porcine larynges to human male and female vocal fold vibrations to determine the best model organism for laryngeal studies concerning vibratory and kinetic characteristics.

Study Design:

Prospective experimental.

Methods:

High-speed videos of phonation were gathered at 4,000 frames per second (fps) in the animal models and human high-speed endoscopy data were gathered at 2,000 fps. Videos were converted into kymograms, and the amplitude, oscillation frequency, and phase difference of vocal fold vibration were measured.

Results:

No statistically significant differences were found with respect to frequency, amplitude, or phase difference between canines and humans. Porcines were not significantly different from human females but did have an oscillation frequency significantly different from human males. Ovine vibrational amplitudes were significantly different from humans, and bovine frequency and amplitude differed significantly from humans.

Conclusions:

Canine and porcine larynges are the most appropriate model specimens for laryngeal studies contingent on vibratory or kinetic properties of phonation.

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