Balloon dilatation eustachian tuboplasty: A clinical study

Authors

  • Thorsten Ockermann MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Bielefeld Academic Teaching Hospital, Bielefeld, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ulf Reineke MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Bielefeld Academic Teaching Hospital, Bielefeld, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Tahwinder Upile FRCS,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Chase Farm Hospital, Enfield, Middlesex and Barnet Hospital, Barnet, Herts, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jörg Ebmeyer MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Bielefeld Academic Teaching Hospital, Bielefeld, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Holger H. Sudhoff MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Bielefeld Academic Teaching Hospital, Bielefeld, Germany
    • Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Bielefeld Academic Teaching Hospital, Affiliated with Bielefeld and Münster University, Teutoburger Str. 50, 33604 Bielefeld, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author

  • The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

To assess the feasibility of balloon dilatation eustachian tuboplasty (BET) as an option for treatment of patients with eustachian tube (ET) dysfunction.

Study Design:

Ethics approved case controlled interventional study.

Methods:

Eight patients were identified with poor ET function using a ET score and were assigned to the study. The endoscopic procedure involved the dilatation of the cartilaginous and bony portion of 13 ETs with a balloon catheter. Pre- and postinterventional computed tomography was performed. All patients were reassessed 1, 2, and 8 weeks after BET.

Results:

BET was technically easy to perform. No damage to essential structures, particularly the carotid canal, was found in the human study. Patients revealed a significant improvement of the ET score comparing pre- and the 2-month post-treatment results. Improvement was found to be time dependent.

Conclusions:

This newly introduced method of BET was found to be a feasible and safe procedure to inflate the ET. It significantly helped to improve ET function in our study group. However, larger long-term studies are necessary to fully evaluate the clinical value of BET. Laryngoscope, 2010

Ancillary