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Do mucosal folds in the eustachian tube function as microturbinates?

Authors

  • Kayhan Ozturk MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Selcuklu Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey
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  • Carl H. Snyderman MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A
    • Department of Otolaryngology, Eye and Ear Institute, Suite 500, 200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213
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  • Isamu Sando MD, DMSc

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A
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  • Presented at the 9th International Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Congress, April 8–10, 2010, Ankara, Turkey.

  • Dr. Kayhan Ozturk was supported by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK). This work was supported by the Core Grant EY08098. The authors have no other funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

Mucosal folds in the eustachian tube (ET) may function as microturbinates and provide protection and clearance.

Study Design:

Descriptive study.

Methods:

Nineteen whole-mount temporal bone ET specimens (nine pediatric and 10 adult) were evaluated in the present study. Five specific localizations for each case were selected. The cartilaginous segment of the ET was divided vertically and the length of mucosal surfaces and the number of mucosal folds of anterior and posterior walls on the histological sections were analyzed with MetaMorph 7.5.2.0 software.

Results:

The length of the mucosal surface of the posterior wall of the ET was longer than the anterior wall (P < .05). In pediatric specimens, the posterior wall had more mucosal folds than adult specimens (P < .05).

Conclusions:

Microturbinates in the posterior wall of the ET may provide important protection and clearance functions for children and play a role in the pathogenesis of eustachian tube dysfunction. Laryngoscope, 2011

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