A new method that uses cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive to fill scoring incisions in septal cartilage correction

Authors

  • İrfan Özyazgan MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Esthetic Surgery, Erciyes University, Faculty of Medicine, Kayseri, Turkey
    • Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Esthetic Surgery, 38039 Melikgazi, Kayseri, Turkey
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  • Onurkan İdacı MD

    1. Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Esthetic Surgery, Erciyes University, Faculty of Medicine, Kayseri, Turkey
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  • This study was partially presented at the 31st National Plastic, Reconstructive and Esthetic Surgery Congress, Adana, Turkey, October 17–21, 2009.

  • The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

Numerous methods are used in the correction of deviated septal cartilage. One of these methods is to perform partial-thickness incisions (scoring) on the concave side of the deviated cartilage. In this retrospective report, we present a series of patients who were treated by filling the scoring incision gaps with cyanoacrylate-based tissue adhesives to increase the effectiveness of scoring incisions and to maintain stability of the corrected concave cartilage segments.

Study Design:

A retrospective clinical study presenting a patient group who was treated using a new surgical method for septal deviation.

Methods:

Twenty-three patients with septum deviation and nasal deformity underwent surgery with the open rhinoplasty approach. Intra- or extracorporeal scoring incisions were performed on the concave side of the deviated septal cartilage, and cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives were applied to the incisions of the corrected cartilage. After polymerization and hardening of the cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive, the operation continued in the normal manner. Preoperative and postoperative clinical results and computed tomography images of the patients were assessed.

Results:

With a mean 24-month follow-up, all patients with respiratory complaints related to deviated septum reported improvement in nose breathing. Clinical and radiologic observations showed that the corrected septum was stable in its new position. There were no complications arising from the use of cyanoacrylate.

Conclusions:

Cyanoacrylate is an effective, instant, safe method of treatment in correcting deviated septal cartilage with scoring incisions and filling the gaps of the incisions.

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