MRI scanning in patients implanted with a vibrant soundbridge

Authors

  • Ingo Todt MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology at ukb, Hospital of the University of Berlin (Charité Medical School), Germany
    • Department of Otolaryngology at ukb, Hospital of the University of Berlin (Charité Medical School), Warener Strasse 7, D-12683 Berlin, Germany
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  • Jan Wagner MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology at ukb, Hospital of the University of Berlin (Charité Medical School), Germany
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  • Romy Goetze PhD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology at ukb, Hearing Therapy Center, Potsdam, Germany
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  • Sandra Scholz PhD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology at ukb, Hospital of the University of Berlin (Charité Medical School), Germany
    2. Department of Otolaryngology at ukb, Hearing Therapy Center, Potsdam, Germany
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  • Rainer Seidl MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology at ukb, Hospital of the University of Berlin (Charité Medical School), Germany
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  • Arne Ernst MD

    1. Department of Otolaryngology at ukb, Hospital of the University of Berlin (Charité Medical School), Germany
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  • The authors have no financial disclosures for this article.

    The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

Abstract

Objective:

To observe the in vivo effects of MRI scanning on the Vibrant Soundbridge system.

Study Design:

Retrospective questionnaire.

Method:

Sixty-three implantees answered a retrospective questionnaire covering their medical/otological and physical conditions pre-, intra-, and post-magnetic resonance imaging scanning (MRI). Bone conduction (BC) thresholds were measured after MRI scanning and compared with the prescan BC.

Results:

Thirteen implantees (20.6%) underwent 19 MRI scans (1; 1.5 T) for different medical indications (e.g., exclusion of a brain tumour, lumbar disc herniation etc.). Scanner-related impulse noise, pain in the middle ear, or pressure at the receiver bed, as well as changes of the transfer function of the floating mass transducer (FMT) are observed frequent effects of MRI scanning. Two patients required transtympanal repositioning of the FMT. A subjectively reported or objectively documented sensorineural hearing loss was not found in any of our patients in this series.

Conclusion:

MRI scanning with an implanted Vibrant Soundbridge has possible major side effects, but did not affect cochlear function in this series.

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