Get access

Sinonasal malignancies in children: A 10-year, single-institutional review§

Authors

  • Jose P. Zevallos MD,

    1. Department of Head and Neck Surgery , University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
    2. Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery , Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kunal S. Jain MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery , Upstate Medical University, State University of New York, Syracuse, New York, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dianna Roberts PhD,

    1. Department of Head and Neck Surgery , University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Adel El-Naggar MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Pathology , University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ehab Y. Hanna MD,

    1. Department of Head and Neck Surgery , University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Michael E. Kupferman MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Head and Neck Surgery , University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
    • Department of Head & Neck Surgery, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 1445, Houston, TX 77030
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This study was presented at the 2010 American Head and Neck Society Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, NV.

  • There is no grant or external financial support.

  • §

    The authors have no financial disclosures for this article.

  • The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives:

Sinonasal malignancies in children are rare, histologically diverse tumors that present diagnostic and management challenges. The purpose of this study is to review the experience of a single cancer center in the management of pediatric sinonasal malignancies.

Study Design:

Retrospective review.

Methods:

Retrospective chart review.

Results:

Forty-four patients were identified. The median age was 12 years (range: 2–17), 54% were female, and the maxillary sinus was the most common primary site. Facial swelling and pain were the most common presenting complaints. Thirty-four patients (76%) in this series had paranasal sinus sarcomas, three patients had esthesioneuroblastomas, and eight patients had carcinomas. The 5-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and recurrence rate for the entire group was 71%, 81%, and 43%, respectively.

Conclusions:

Pediatric sinonasal malignancies are rare, locally aggressive tumors associated with nonspecific signs and symptoms. Multimodality treatment can result in 5-year overall and disease-specific survival rates of over 70%. A multidisciplinary team approach is essential to optimize outcomes and limit the morbidity of treatment.

Ancillary