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Keywords:

  • Posterior glottic stenosis;
  • glottic scar;
  • cricoarytenoid joint ankylosis;
  • cricoarytenoid joint immobility;
  • tracheostomy;
  • voice;
  • decannulation;
  • type I posterior glottic stenosis;
  • Level of Evidence: 4.

Abstract

Background:

The Type I Posterior Glottic Stenosis (PGS-I) is a well-described but uncommon clinical entity. Despite this, there is little known about the outcome of surgical treatment.

Methods:

Retrospective case series.

Results:

Thirteen cases met inclusion criteria. All but one patient had a tracheostomy at the time of initial evaluation. At the postoperative visit, seven patients (54%) had completely normal vocal fold motion. Of the verbal patients, 6 (50%) had normal vocal function as reported by both the patient/caregiver and the physician, and 10 (83%) patients were successfully decannulated.

Conclusions:

Patients with an isolated interarytenoid synechia have an excellent prognosis with regard to decannulation. Although many patients regain normal vocal fold motion and a return to their preintubation vocal function, a significant proportion can have persistent deficits in vocal fold mobility and some level of dysphonia. This report represents the largest known series of PGS-I cases.