Lysis of interarytenoid synechia (Type I posterior glottic stenosis): Vocal fold mobility and airway results§

Authors

  • Tanya K. Meyer MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.
    • Department of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, University of Washington Medical Center, Box 356515, Seattle, WA 98195-6515
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jeffrey Wolf MD

    1. Department of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This article was presented as a poster at the Spring 2011 COSM meeting as part of the American Laryngological Association.

  • There was no financial support or funding for this project.

  • §

    Tanya Meyer and Jeffrey Wolf have no financial disclosures.

  • The authors have no conflicts of interests to disclose.

Abstract

Background:

The Type I Posterior Glottic Stenosis (PGS-I) is a well-described but uncommon clinical entity. Despite this, there is little known about the outcome of surgical treatment.

Methods:

Retrospective case series.

Results:

Thirteen cases met inclusion criteria. All but one patient had a tracheostomy at the time of initial evaluation. At the postoperative visit, seven patients (54%) had completely normal vocal fold motion. Of the verbal patients, 6 (50%) had normal vocal function as reported by both the patient/caregiver and the physician, and 10 (83%) patients were successfully decannulated.

Conclusions:

Patients with an isolated interarytenoid synechia have an excellent prognosis with regard to decannulation. Although many patients regain normal vocal fold motion and a return to their preintubation vocal function, a significant proportion can have persistent deficits in vocal fold mobility and some level of dysphonia. This report represents the largest known series of PGS-I cases.

Ancillary