Hennebert's sign in superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome: A Video Case Report

Authors

  • Andrew G. Shuman MD,

    1. Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
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  • Syed S. Rizvi MD,

    1. Division of Otology and Neurotology, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A
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  • Chantale W. Pirouet AuD,

    1. Hearing Wellness Centre, Windsor, Ontario, Canada
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  • Katherine D. Heidenreich MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Otology and Neurotology, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A
    • Division of Otology and Neurotology, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, 1904 Taubman Center, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
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  • The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SSCD) syndrome has been called the great otologic mimicker because its presentation overlaps with otosclerosis, Meniere's disease, perilymphatic fistula, and patulous eustachian tube. A valuable examination finding that can help distinguish SSCD syndrome from other pathologic conditions is the presence of Hennebert's sign, in which pressure changes in the external auditory canal evoke stereotyped eye movements that align in the plane of the dehiscent semicircular canal. This video case report demonstrates Hennebert's sign associated with SSCD syndrome and discusses its pathophysiological basis.

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