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Radiological pitfalls with laryngopharyngeal injectables

Authors

  • Stefan W. Shuaib BA,

    1. Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
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  • Andrew A. Potter MD,

    1. Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas, U.S.A
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  • Lawrence E. Ginsberg MD,

    1. Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
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  • Michael E. Kupferman MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
    • Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1400 Pressler St., Unit 1445, Houston, TX 77030
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  • Michael E. Kupferman, MD, has received an honorarium and travel grant from Bioform Medical, Inc., San Mateo, California. The authors have no other funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

The aim of this report was to describe the computed tomography features of injected carboxymethylcellulose and how it can be mistaken for tumor recurrence. Carboxymethylcellulose is a low-density injectable indicated for short-term vocal fold augmentation. When used in patients with head and neck cancer, differentiating this agent from a neoplastic recurrence can be difficult on imaging. The imaging findings of five patients who received carboxymethylcellulose augmentation are presented to illustrate a potential pitfall of image interpretation. When injectable carboxymethylcellulose is used in cancer patients, knowledge of the injection sites, material used, and procedural history can avoid misinterpretation of monitory imaging.

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