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Histologic changes in transplanted expanded polytetrafluoroethylene in an animal model

Authors

  • Ji Heui Kim MD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea
    2. Facial Skeleton Bio Institute, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea
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  • Chan Hum Park MD, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea
    2. Facial Skeleton Bio Institute, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea
    • Associate Professor, Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, 153, Kyo-Dong, Chuncheon, 200-704, Korea
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  • Ok Joo Lee PhD,

    1. Facial Skeleton Bio Institute, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea
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  • Jun Ho Lee MD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea
    2. Facial Skeleton Bio Institute, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea
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  • Seok Min Hong MD, PhD

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea
    2. Facial Skeleton Bio Institute, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea
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  • This work was supported by a grant from the BioGreen 21 Program (No. PJ007170201005) and the Cooperative Research Program for Agriculture Science & Technology Development (PJ007676201002), Rural Development Administration, Republic of Korea. The authors have no other funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

Several materials have been used for nasal augmentation surgery. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) (Gore-Tex; W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) has proven to be an ideal synthetic material for nasal augmentation. Gore-Tex contains numerous pores that stabilize an implant, but this advantage has been tempered by unpredictable outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate morphologic and histologic changes in nonreinforced Gore-Tex in a rabbit model.

Study Design:

In vivo study using a rabbit model.

Methods:

To analyze histologic changes, we used 20 New Zealand white rabbits. Gore-Tex was implanted into the nasal dorsum of the rabbits. Then, en bloc specimens containing the implant and surrounding soft tissues were sampled 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation. We evaluated the three-dimensional size of the implants over time using light and electron microscopy to investigate histologic and morphologic changes.

Results:

Following gross analysis, none of the implants were lost or extruded, and there was no evidence of wound infection. Diminution rates of thickness, width, and height in the implants were 22%, 2%, and 5%, respectively. Histologically, connective tissue growth was observed in all specimens, and the internodal space decreased owing to connective tissue ingrowth over time. Neovascularization was observed 3 months after implantation, and degenerative changes were also observed after 6 months.

Conclusions:

Gore-Tex should be carefully trimmed for use in augmentation because of its potential to decrease in size over time. Additional studies are necessary before these results can be applied in clinical practice.

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