SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Keywords:

  • Pain;
  • taste;
  • glossodynia;
  • treatment;
  • irritation;
  • hypogeusia;
  • Level of Evidence: 1b

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

In the treatment of burning mouth syndrome (BMS), various approaches have been tried with equivocal results. The aim of the present randomized clinical trial was to determine the efficacy of clonazepam, a GABA agonist designed as an antiepileptic drug that exerts the typical effects of benzodiazepines.

Study Design:

Randomized clinical trial.

Methods:

Twenty patients with idiopathic BMS were carefully selected. Clonazepam (0.5 mg/day, n = 10) or placebo (lactose, n = 10) were randomly assigned to the patients.

Results:

Patients on clonazepam significantly improved in pain ratings (P < .001). These changes were less pronounced in the placebo group (P < .11). No significant changes were observed in a mood scale (P = .56) or for depression scores (P = .56). Taste test and salivary flow increased over sessions, but were not different between groups (P = .83 and P = .06, respectively).

Conclusions:

Clonazepam appears to have a positive effect on pain in BMS patients. Laryngoscope, 2012