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Wire grill brush bristle as an unusual foreign body: Report of two pediatric cases

Authors

  • Jill M. Arganbright MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, U.S.A
    • MD, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., MS 3010, Kansas City, KS66160
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  • Daniel E. Bruegger MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, U.S.A
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  • Kevin J. Sykes MPH,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, U.S.A
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  • Julie L. Wei MD

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, U.S.A
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  • The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Wire grill brushes are commonly used for cleaning grill grates. Accidental ingestion of a wire bristle from a grill-cleaning brush is a rarely reported foreign body, with only three prior case reports. Although scarce in the literature, we encountered two pediatric cases at the regional children's hospital within 1 year. By presenting these two cases, our goal was to raise awareness of this potentially hazardous foreign body. Additionally, we raise a consumer safety issue associated with the use of wire grill-cleaning brushes as there are currently no ingestion hazard warnings on these products. Laryngoscope,, 2011

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