Late complications of nickel–titanium alloy stent in tracheal stenosis

Authors

  • Wenxian Chen MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Tang Du Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xian, Shanxi, China
    • Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Tang Du Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xian 710038, Shanxi, P. R. China
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  • Yanyan Ruan MD

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Tang Du Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xian, Shanxi, China
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  • Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Chinese Military Medical Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Zhoushan, Zhejiang, P. R. China, June 2011.

  • The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

To investigate and treat the late complications of using nickel–titanium alloy stents in laryngotracheal, bronchial, and esophageal stenosis patients who developed severe laryngotracheal stenosis (SLS).

Study Design:

Retrospective clinical study.

Methods:

Thirteen patients with SLS or tracheoesophageal fistula secondary to insertion of a nickel–titanium alloy stent for treatment of laryngotracheal, bronchial, or esophageal stenosis treated between May 2004 and March 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 13 total patients, nine had one stent placed, and four had two stents placed. The late complications observed were glottic and/or subglottic extension of cervical tracheal stenosis (n = 6), new stricture of the thoracic trachea (n = 4), severe left bronchial stricture with massive left pulmonary collapse (n = 1), and cervical tracheoesophageal fistula (n = 2).

Results:

Six patients with glottic and/or subglottic to cervical tracheal stenosis underwent successful laryngotracheal reconstruction. Two patients with subglottic and upper thoracic tracheal stenosis were successfully treated by staged operation for the stenosis. Two patients with subglottic and distal thoracic tracheal stenosis are still undergoing treatment. One patient with severe left bronchial stricture and massive left pulmonary collapse has been treated but has not achieved full recovery. One patient with cervical tracheoesophageal fistula underwent successful repair but died later from metastatic disease. One patient with tracheoesophageal fistula died from massive hemorrhage and asphyxiation induced by the stent, which had not been removed.

Conclusions:

The nickel–titanium alloy stents should be used with extreme caution in patients with laryngotracheal, bronchial, or esophageal stenosis treatment that can be corrected by surgical therapy. Laryngoscope, 2012

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