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Minimally invasive surgery for parapharyngeal space tumors

Authors

  • Daniel M. Beswick BS,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Alec Vaezi MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Emiro Caicedo-Granados MD, MS,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A
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  • Umamaheswar Duvvuri MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    • Suite 500, Eye and Ear Institute, 200 Lothrop St., Pittsburgh, PA 15213
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  • The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

Parapharyngeal space (PS) tumors are surrounded by critical anatomical structures. Resection is often challenging due to limited surgical exposure. Herein, we report a novel transcervical, minimally invasive, video-assisted technique that facilitates the resection of PS lesions.

Study Design:

Case series and review of literature.

Methods:

Description of surgical technique with analysis of four cases and literature review.

Results:

The technique combines a transcervical approach to the PS and skull base with video-assisted and image-guided dissection of tumor. Four cases of benign PS tumors resected with this technique are reported. The size of the tumor excised varied between 0.9 cm and 5 cm. Estimated blood losses were minimal. The average length of hospital stay was 1.5 days. No permanent complications were encountered.

Conclusions:

Excision of PS tumor abutting the skull base using a novel minimally invasive, video-assisted, image-guided, transcervical approach is feasible and safe. The short hospitalization stay and low morbidity makes it well suited for the resection of benign PS lesions.

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