Patient-reported speech in noise difficulties and hyperacusis symptoms and correlation with test results§

Authors

  • Chrysa Spyridakou MRCS, DO-HNS, MSc,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neuro-otology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
    • Department of Neuro-otology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, WC1N 3BG United Kingdom
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  • Linda M. Luxon BSc(Hons), MBBS, FRCP,

    1. Department of Neuro-otology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
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  • Doris E. Bamiou MD, MSc, PhD

    1. Department of Neuro-otology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
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  • Extracts from this work were shortlisted for the Politzer Prize and presented at the 27th Politzer Society meeting on September 5, 2009, in London, United Kingdom.

  • This research study was conducted at the Neuro-otology Department at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery.

  • §

    The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

To compare self-reported symptoms of difficulty hearing speech in noise and hyperacusis in adults with auditory processing disorders (APDs) and normal controls; and to compare self-reported symptoms to objective test results (speech in babble test, transient evoked otoacoustic emission [TEOAE] suppression test using contralateral noise).

Study Design:

A prospective case–control pilot study.

Methods:

Twenty-two participants were recruited in the study: 10 patients with reported hearing difficulty, normal audiometry, and a clinical diagnosis of APD; and 12 normal age-matched controls with no reported hearing difficulty. All participants completed the validated Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability questionnaire, a hyperacusis questionnaire, a speech in babble test, and a TEOAE suppression test using contralateral noise.

Results:

Patients had significantly worse scores than controls in all domains of the Amsterdam Inventory questionnaire (with the exception of sound detection) and the hyperacusis questionnaire (P < .005). Patients also had worse TEOAE suppression test results in both ears than controls; however, this result was not significant after Bonferroni correction. Strong correlations were observed between self-reported symptoms of difficulty hearing speech in noise and speech in babble test results in the right ear (ρ = 0.624, P = .002), and between self-reported symptoms of hyperacusis and TEOAE suppression test results in the right ear (ρ = −0.597 P = .003).

Conclusions:

There was no significant correlation between the two tests. A strong correlation was observed between right ear speech in babble and patient-reported intelligibility of speech in noise, and right ear TEOAE suppression by contralateral noise and hyperacusis questionnaire. Laryngoscope, 2012

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