High-resolution computed tomography analysis of the prevalence of onodi cells

Authors

  • Senja Tomovic MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery
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  • Azadeh Esmaeili MD,

    1. Department of Radiology, and Department of Neurosurgery, University of Medicine
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  • Norman J. Chan MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery
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  • Osamah J. Choudhry BA,

    1. Dentistry of New Jersey–New Jersey Medical School; and Center for Skull Base
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  • Pratik A. Shukla BA,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery
    2. Department of Radiology, and Department of Neurosurgery, University of Medicine
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  • James K. Liu MD,

    1. Dentistry of New Jersey–New Jersey Medical School; and Center for Skull Base
    2. Pituitary Surgery, Neurological Institute of New Jersey, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.A.
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  • Jean Anderson Eloy MD, FACS

    Corresponding author
    1. Dentistry of New Jersey–New Jersey Medical School; and Center for Skull Base
    2. Pituitary Surgery, Neurological Institute of New Jersey, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.A.
    • Assistant Professor and Vice Chairman, Director of Rhinology and Sinus Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, 90 Bergen Street, Suite 8100, Newark, NJ 07103
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  • Presented at the 22nd North American Skull Base Society Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.A., February 17–19, 2012.

  • The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

Onodi cells are the posterior-most ethmoid air cells that lie superior to the sphenoid sinus. Identification of these cells is essential prior to endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery due to their intricate relationship with the optic nerves and carotid arteries, which may lead to deleterious complications. In this study, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans from 170 adult-patients were analyzed by two independent observers for the presence of Onodi cells.

Study Design:

Radiographic analysis at a tertiary care medical center.

Methods:

A retrospective analysis was performed on patients undergoing HRCT between July 2008 and September 2010. Incidence of Onodi cells and demographic data were collected.

Results:

The overall prevalence of Onodi cells in this cohort was 65.3%. Subgroup analysis based on ethnicity showed a rate of Onodi cells of 83.3% in Asians, 73.1% in whites, 57.0% in African Americans, and 62.7% in Hispanics. The prevalence of Onodi cells was not significantly different among the different ethnicities (P > .05). However, this was limited by a small sample size in some ethnic groups. Onodi cell prevalence was equivalent among males and females: 62.2% and 63.5% respectively (P > .05). Overall, our results show a greater prevalence of Onodi cells than previously reported.

Conclusions:

We found a higher prevalence of Onodi cells in our cohort than previously reported in the literature. Therefore, it is important for surgeons to anticipate the presence of these cells during endoscopic sinus and skull base procedures to prevent potential complications. Laryngoscope, 2012

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