Management of nonesthesioneuroblastoma sinonasal malignancies with neuroendocrine differentiation

Authors

  • David Fried BS,

    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Adam M. Zanation MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    2. Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Benjamin Huang MD,

    1. Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Neil Hayes MD,

    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    2. Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • David E. Morris MD,

    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    2. Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Julian Rosenman MD,

    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    2. Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Mahesh Varia MD,

    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    2. Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • William Funkhouser MD,

    1. Department of Pathology, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    2. Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Mark Weissler MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    2. Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Bhishamjit S. Chera MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    2. Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
    • 101 Manning Drive, CB: 7512, Chapel Hill, NC 27514
    Search for more papers by this author

  • The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis:

Report the outcomes of patients with nonesthesioneuroblastoma (non-ENB) sinonasal malignancies with neuroendocrine differentiation.

Study Design:

Single Institution Retrospective Case Series.

Methods:

We conducted a retrospective chart review of 19 biopsy-proven non-ENB sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinomas diagnosed between 1997 and 2010 and treated with multimodality therapy. Kaplan-Meier estimates of local-regional control (LRC), distant metastases–free survival (DMFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated.

Results:

The 3-year LRC, FFDM, and OS rates were 63%, 50%, and 64%, respectively. All nine patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) had at least a pathologic partial response: three of seven sinonasal undifferentiated carcinomas and two of two sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinomas had complete pathological responses. All five patients with pathologic complete responses were alive without disease at a median follow-up of 43 (29–67) months.

Conclusions:

Having a complete response pathologically to CRT was a favorable prognostic indicator. Neoadjuvant CRT followed by surgery seems to be an efficacious sequence of multimodality therapy.

Ancillary