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Congenital granular cell tumor with uncommon clinical behavior

Authors

  • Sebastian Roesch MD,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, General Hospital Salzburg, University Hospital of Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria
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  • Martin Dejaco MD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, General Hospital Salzburg, University Hospital of Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria
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  • Cornelia Hauser-Kronberger MD,

    1. Department of Pathology, General Hospital Salzburg, University Hospital of Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria
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  • Gerd Rasp MD

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, General Hospital Salzburg, University Hospital of Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria
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  • Oral presentation was made at the 54th Austrian ENT Congress 2010 of the Austrian Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, in Salzburg, Austria, September 15–19, 2010.

  • Work was done at Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, General Hospital Salzburg, University Hospital of Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria.

  • The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, General Hospital–Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Müllner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg, Austria. E-mail: s.roesch@salk.at

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis

Congenital granular cell tumor (CGCT), also known as congenital epulis, is a rare benign mesenchymal tumor of the oral cavity. We report of a 3 years and 7 months old female patient undergoing surgical excision of an oral tumor. Subsequent histological and immunohistological investigations within the clinical course led to the diagnosis of CGCT. However, clinical findings in this case, such as primary onset and an untypical location within the oral cavity, clearly stand in contrast to those usually found in CGCT, resulting in an exceptional case not previously described in the literature. Laryngoscope, 123:2459–2462, 2013

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