Change of obstruction level during drug-induced sleep endoscopy according to sedation depth in obstructive sleep apnea

Authors

  • Sang Duk Hong MD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul
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  • Hun-Jong Dhong MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul
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  • Hyo Yeol Kim MD, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul
    • Send correspondence to Hyo Yeol Kim, MD, PhD, Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Irwon-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135–710, Korea. E-mail: siamkhy@skku.edu

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  • Jung Hyeob Sohn MD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul
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  • Yong Gi Jung MD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Changwon, Republic of Korea
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  • Seung-Kyu Chung MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul
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  • Ju Yeon Park MD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul
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  • Jin Kyoung Kim MD, PhD

    1. Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul
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  • The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis

We evaluated the change in upper airway collapse according to the depth of sedation during drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE), as well as characteristics possibly associated with that change.

Study Design

Prospective, single center, observational study.

Methods

Twenty-nine patients with upper airway collapse were twice evaluated using DISE according to the depth of sedation, as confirmed by the bispectral index (BIS), which is a measure of the level of consciousness. Changes in the site and degree of obstruction according to the change in sedation depth at the retropalatal and the retroglossal levels were evaluated. The possible contributing factors of this change were explored.

Results

As DISE sedation deepened, the upper airway became narrower in 37% of patients at the retropalatal level and in 44.8% of patients at the retroglossal level. No clinical, polysomnographic, or cephalometric variables showed any association with the change in the degree of retroglossal airway narrowing, with the exception of mouth breathing during DISE.

Conclusions

The degree of upper airway narrowing can be aggravated according to the sedation depth. The monitoring of sedation depth during DISE is critical, especially in patients with mouth breathing.

Level of Evidence

4. Laryngoscope, 123:2896–2899, 2013

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