A late recognition of tapia syndrome

A case report and literature review

Authors

  • Artur Gevorgyan MD, MSc, FRCSC,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • Julian M. Nedzelski MD, FRCSC

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Send correspondence to Artur Gevorgyan, MD, MSc, FRCSC, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Room M1–102, Toronto, ON, M4N 3M5, Canada. E-mail: artur.gevorgyan@mail.utoronto.ca

Abstract

Tapia syndrome is characterized by concurrent paralysis of the recurrent laryngeal and hypoglossal nerves. The mechanism is associated with airway manipulation in 70% of patients and is attributed to compression or stretching of these nerves. Diagnosis is based on recognition of the concurrent paralyses and investigations to exclude central or vascular causes. Treatment is supportive, with emphasis on empiric corticosteroids and dysphagia therapy. Recovery is excellent in 30% of patients, incomplete in 39% of patients, and none in over 26% of patients. A case of a 48-year-old woman is described, who was diagnosed with Tapia syndrome 3 years after the suspected injury. Laryngoscope, 123:2423–2427, 2013

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