A pain in the neck

Lateral thyrohyoid ligament syndrome

Authors

  • Parul Sinha MBBS, MS,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.
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  • David J. Grindler MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.
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  • Bruce H. Haughey MBChB, FACS, FRACS

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.
    • Send correspondence to Bruce H. Haughey, MBChB, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8115, St. Louis, MO 63110. E-mail: haugheyb@ent.wustl.edu

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  • This article was published online on Oct. 22, 2013. An error was subsequently identified. This notice is included in the online and print versions to indicate that both have been corrected.

Abstract

A lateralized pain in the neck is a common symptom encountered by the otolaryngologist. This complaint, frequently caused by lateral thyrohyoid ligament syndrome, is often misdiagnosed. The pathophysiology of this syndrome may relate to overuse and inflammation. [change made here after initial online publication]. Typically, patients present with chronic unilateral neck pain often associated with odynophagia. The point of maximum tenderness localizes over the axis of the lateral thyrohyoid ligament. We present a series of 15 patients, in whom treatment with depot steroid and local anesthetic injection (n = 14) improved symptoms in 12 (86%), with complete resolution in nine (64%) patients. Laryngoscope, 124:116–118, 2014

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