Get access

Scientific inquiry into rhinosinusitis: Who is receiving funding from the National Institutes of Health?

Authors

  • Adam J. Folbe MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Peter F. Svider MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan
    • Send correspondence to Peter F. Svider, MD, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4201 St. Antoine, 5E-UHC, Detroit, MI 48201. E-mail: psvider@gmail.com

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Michael Setzen MD, FACS,

    1. Rhinology Section, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York
    2. Department of Otolaryngology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Giancarlo Zuliani MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan
    2. Section of Otolaryngology, Department of Surgery, John D. Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, Michigan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ho-Sheng Lin MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan
    2. Section of Otolaryngology, Department of Surgery, John D. Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, Michigan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jean Anderson Eloy MD, FACS

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.A
    2. Department of Neurological Surgery, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.A
    3. Center for Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery, Neurological Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.A
    Search for more papers by this author

  • m.s. has been on the speakers bureaus for Teva and Meda (not related to current subject).

  • The authors have no other funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis

To evaluate National Institutes of Health (NIH) support for rhinosinusitis research and characterize the proportion of funding awarded to otolaryngologists.

Study Design

Analysis of the NIH RePORTER database.

Methods

Specialty and terminal-degree of primary investigators (PIs) for 131 projects spanning 364 fiscal years (1989 to present) were determined. Awards for projects examining rhinosinusitis were organized by size, academic department, and PI scholarly impact (using h-indices). Analysis of geographic and temporal funding trends was performed and organized by PI specialty.

Results

A total of 62.6% of projects were awarded to physicians, one-third of whom were otolaryngologists. Allergists/immunologists had greater median awards than otolaryngologist PIs (P = .02), and pediatric-trained PIs had a greater h-index than otolaryngologist PIs (P = .04). Although year-to-year fluctuation was noted, otolaryngologists have received approximately a quarter of total rhinosinusitis funding since 2000. PIs practicing in the south-Atlantic, east-north-central, and west-north-central states had the greatest funding totals, whereas otolaryngologists had a greater proportion of regional funding in the Pacific and east-south-central states than other regions.

Conclusions

Inquiry into the mechanisms underlying rhinosinusitis and optimal therapeutic strategies represents an interdisciplinary venture. PIs in medicine and pediatric departments had greater funding for rhinosinusitis projects than individuals in otolaryngology departments, partly because of greater utilization of PhD faculty. Otolaryngology departments may consider increased recruitment of basic scientists interested in rhinosinusitis as a means to facilitate increased scholarship in this area. Encouraging pursuit of funding opportunities is critical for otolaryngologists, as well-funded practitioners may have greater opportunities to shape advances and serve as an advocate for their approaches.

Level of Evidence

NALaryngoscope, 124:1301–1307, 2014

Ancillary