Video-based method of quantifying performance and instrument motion during simulated phonosurgery

Authors

  • Ellen Conroy,

    1. Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ketan Surender MSc,

    1. Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Zhixian Geng PhD,

    1. Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ting Chen MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Fujian Provincial College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Seth Dailey MD,

    1. Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jack Jiang MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A
    • Send correspondence to Jack J. Jiang, MD, 1300 University Avenue, 2745 Medical Sciences Center, Madison, WI 53706. E-mail: jjjiang@wisc.edu

    Search for more papers by this author

  • This study was funded by NIH grant number R01 DC008153 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders.

  • The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis

To investigate the use of the Video-Based Phonomicrosurgery Instrument Tracking System to collect instrument position data during simulated phonomicrosurgery and calculate motion metrics using these data. We used this system to determine if novice subject motion metrics improved over 1 week of training.

Study Design

Prospective cohort study.

Methods

Ten subjects performed simulated surgical tasks once per day for 5 days. Instrument position data were collected and used to compute motion metrics (path length, depth perception, and motion smoothness). Data were analyzed to determine if motion metrics improved with practice time. Task outcome was also determined each day, and relationships between task outcome and motion metrics were used to evaluate the validity of motion metrics as indicators of surgical performance.

Results

Significant decreases over time were observed for path length (P < .001), depth perception (P < .001), and task outcome (P < .001). No significant change was observed for motion smoothness. Significant relationships were observed between task outcome and path length (P < .001), depth perception (P < .001), and motion smoothness (P < .001).

Conclusions

Our system can estimate instrument trajectory and provide quantitative descriptions of surgical performance. It may be useful for evaluating phonomicrosurgery performance. Path length and depth perception may be particularly useful indicators.

Level of Evidence

NA Laryngoscope 124:2332–2337, 2014

Ancillary