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SOIL DEGRADATION AND ALTERED FLOOD RISK AS A CONSEQUENCE OF DEFORESTATION

Authors

  • M. J. de la Paix,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang, PR China
    2. Independent Institute of Lay Adventists of Kigali (INILAK), Kigali-Rwanda
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  • L. Lanhai,

    Corresponding author
    • State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang, PR China
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  • C. Xi,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang, PR China
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  • S. Ahmed,

    1. University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Las Vegas, NV, USA
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  • A. Varenyam

    1. State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang, PR China
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Correspondence to: L. Lanhai, State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography Chinese Academy of Sciences, 818 Beijing Road South, Urumqi, Xinjiang, 830011, PR China.

E-mail: lilh@ms.xjb.ac.cn

ABSTRACT

The primary objective of this study was to analyze soil degradation and altered flood risks as a consequence of deforestation. The results showed that the use of fuelwood and competition for agriculture land are the main causes of deforestation, which leads to increased soil erosion and floods. The consequences and the societal risks from floods are quantified. This study indicates that the numbers of fatalities and mortality per river flood event are lower compared with those caused by flash floods. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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