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Functional organic single crystals for solid-state laser applications

Authors

  • Hong-Hua Fang,

    1. State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun, China
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  • Jie Yang,

    1. State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun, China
    2. Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Groningen, AG, The Netherlands
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  • Jing Feng,

    1. State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun, China
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  • Takeshi Yamao,

    1. Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan
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  • Shu Hotta,

    1. Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan
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  • Hong-Bo Sun

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun, China
    2. College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, China
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Functional organic single crystals for solid-state laser applications Volume 9, Issue 1, 128, Article first published online: 17 December 2014

Abstract

Because of long-range order and high chemical purity, organic crystals have exhibit unique properties and attracted a lot of interest for application in solid-state lasers. As optical gain materials, they exhibit high stimulated emission cross section and broad tunable wavelength emission as similar to their amorphous counterpart; moreover, high purity and high order give them superior properties such as low scattering trap densities, high thermal stability, as well as highly polarized emission. As electronic materials, they are potentially able to support high current densities, thus making it possible to realize current driven lasers. This paper mainly describes recent research progress in organic semiconductor laser crystals. The building molecules, crystal growth methods, as well as their stimulated emission characteristics related with crystal structures are introduced; in addition, the current state-of-the-art in the field of crystal laser devices is reviewed. Furthermore, recent advances of crystal lasers at the nanoscale and single crystal light-emitting transistors (LETs) are presented. Finally, an outlook and personal view is provided on the further developments of laser crystals and their applications.

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