Laser & Photonics Reviews

Cover image for Laser & Photonics Reviews

July 2008

Volume 2, Issue 3

Pages 113–215

  1. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Contents
    3. Editorial
    4. News and Highlights
    5. Conference News
    6. Original Papers
  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Contents
    3. Editorial
    4. News and Highlights
    5. Conference News
    6. Original Papers
    1. Editorial: The First Year (page 117)

      Guido W. Fuchs

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810504

  3. News and Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Contents
    3. Editorial
    4. News and Highlights
    5. Conference News
    6. Original Papers
    1. News and Highlights (pages 119–121)

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810505

  4. Conference News

    1. Top of page
    2. Contents
    3. Editorial
    4. News and Highlights
    5. Conference News
    6. Original Papers
    1. Conference News (pages 123–124)

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810506

  5. Original Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Contents
    3. Editorial
    4. News and Highlights
    5. Conference News
    6. Original Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Nonlinear surface plasmon polaritonic crystals (pages 125–135)

      G.A. Wurtz and A.V. Zayats

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810006

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      We present an overview of the optical properties of nonlinear surface plasmon polaritonic crystals and their applications to control light with light. Surface plasmon polaritonic crystals are periodically nanostructured metal surfaces or thin metal films that act as two-dimensional photonic crystals for surface polaritons. Hybridization of such nanostructures with dielectrics exhibiting an optical nonlinear response allows utilization of the electromagnetic field enhancement effects to observe nonlinear effects and bistable behaviour at low light intensities. By changing the geometry of the nanostructured film, the dispersion of the crystal is modified and, thus, electromagnetic mode structure and associated density of states can be controllably tuned in the desired spectral range. This provides enhanced flexibility in engineering the nonlinear optical response of plasmonic crystals in a chosen spectral range for both control and signal wavelengths.

    2. Metal-nanoparticle plasmonics (pages 136–159)

      M. Pelton, J. Aizpurua and G. Bryant

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810003

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The rapid emergence of nanoplasmonics as a novel technology has been driven by recent progress in the fabrication, characterization, and understanding of metal-nanoparticle systems. In this review, we highlight some of the key advances in each of these areas. We emphasize the basic physical understanding and experimental techniques that will enable a new generation of applications in nano-optics

    3. High-brightness long-wavelength semiconductor disk lasers (pages 160–181)

      N. Schulz, J.-M. Hopkins, M. Rattunde, D. Burns and J. Wagner

      Version of Record online: 25 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200710037

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      A review on the recent developments in the field of long-wavelength (λ >1.2μm) high-brightness optically-pumped semiconductor disk lasers (OPSDLs) is presented. As thermal effects have such a crucial impact on the laser performance particular emphasis is given to modelling the thermal behaviour and optimisation of the heat-sinking. Selected OPSDL devices, realized in different III-V and IV-VI semiconductor material systems, with corresponding emission wavelengths between 1.2 μm and 5.3 μm are presented. Specific applications in this broad spectral range are addressed and methods to obtain high output power are discussed in terms of the underlying material properties and device operating principles.

    4. Light propagation in multi-step index optical fibres (pages 182–202)

      J. Zubia, G. Aldabaldetreku, G. Durana, J. Arrue and F. Jiménez

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200710030

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      This paper reviews the theoretical analysis of light propagation we have carried out on multimode multi-step index (MSI) optical fibres. Starting from the Eikonal equation, we derive the analytical expressions that allow calculating the ray trajectories inside these fibres. We also analyse the effects of leaky rays on the transmission properties of MSI fibres. For this purpose, a single analytical expression for the evaluation of the ray power transmission coefficient is calculated. Afterwards, we investigate the effects of extrinsic and intrinsic coupling losses on the performance of MSI fibres, providing analytical expressions to calculate the coupling loss and, also, determining the most critical parameters. Finally, we carry out a comprehensive numerical analysis of the fibre bandwidth under different source configurations.

    5. Design of GRIN optical components for coupling and interconnects (pages 203–215)

      C. Gomez-Reino, M.V. Perez, C. Bao and M.T. Flores-Arias

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810002

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      This paper reviews the design of some optical systems for coupling and interconnection by GRIN components. The optical systems designed with these components are based on imaging and transforming properties of such components to carry out specific functions. First of all, a brief description of light propagation through GRIN materials will be given. After that, a device to couple light by a GRIN fiber lens into fibers of different core sizes with low loss is described. The coupling efficiency as well as the coupling loss are studied versus variation of the GRIN fiber lens length and the refractive-index profile of the coupler. The design of crossover and parallel interconnects by using a GRIN planar structure will be presented. The optical analysis includes the PSF for describing the performance of the device and the SBP for estimating the numbers of channels that can be handled. The dependence of the number of channels on the wavelength of light and the transverse aperture of the planar interconnect is shown.

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