Laser & Photonics Reviews

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 5

September 2009

Volume 3, Issue 5

Pages A35–A42, 407–482

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News and Highlights
    5. Conference News
    6. Editor's Choice
    7. Reviews
    1. Cover Picture: Laser & Photon. Rev. 3(5)/2009

      Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200990007

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ablation impact of a spherical polystyrene particle on a silicon surface irradiated with single femtosecond pulses. The anisotropy is a result of the near-field-enhanced sub-threshold ablation process.

      (Picture: A. Plech, P. Leiderer, J. Boneberg, pp. 435–451, in this issue)

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News and Highlights
    5. Conference News
    6. Editor's Choice
    7. Reviews
  3. News and Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News and Highlights
    5. Conference News
    6. Editor's Choice
    7. Reviews
    1. News and Highlights (pages A39–A40)

      Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200910514

  4. Conference News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News and Highlights
    5. Conference News
    6. Editor's Choice
    7. Reviews
    1. Conference News (pages A41–A42)

      Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200910515

  5. Editor's Choice

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News and Highlights
    5. Conference News
    6. Editor's Choice
    7. Reviews
    1. You have free access to this content
      Semiconductor disk lasers for the generation of visible and ultraviolet radiation (pages 407–434)

      S. Calvez, J.E. Hastie, M. Guina, O.G. Okhotnikov and M.D. Dawson

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810042

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent developments in semiconductor disk lasers generating visible or ultraviolet light are reviewed. After an introduction on potential applications, it is discussed how the combination of vertical-emitting semiconductor GaAs-based structures and intra-cavity nonlinear conversion techniques can be successfully exploited to uniquely meet demands for continuous-wave radiation in the visible and ultraviolet spectral range. To do so, an overview of the device operating principles and performance is presented highlighting the underlying material considerations, semiconductor structural designs, thermal management techniques and suitable cavity configurations. This summary is completed by a presentation of new developments in the field, with a particular focus on the trends towards miniaturization.

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News and Highlights
    5. Conference News
    6. Editor's Choice
    7. Reviews
    1. Femtosecond laser near field ablation (pages 435–451)

      A. Plech, P. Leiderer and J. Boneberg

      Version of Record online: 12 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810044

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The high field strength of femtosecond laser pulses leads to nonlinear effects during the interaction with condensed matter. One such effect is the ablation process, which can be initiated below the threshold of common thermal ablation if the excitation pulses are sufficiently short. This effect leads to structure formation, which is anisotropic because of the polarization properties of the near field and can result in pattern sizes below the resolution limit of light. These effects are explored by temporally resolved scattering methods and by post-mortem analysis to show the non-thermal and anisotropic nature of this process. The near-field distribution of plasmon modes can be tailored to a large extent in order to obtain control of the pattern formation.

    2. Performance comparison of slow-light coupled-resonator optical gyroscopes (pages 452–465)

      M. Terrel, M.J.F. Digonnet and S. Fan

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810052

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The connection between group velocity and rotation sensitivity is investigated for a number of resonant gyroscope designs. Two key comparisons are made. First, a comparison is done between two conventional sensors, namely a resonant fiber optic gyroscope (RFOG) and an interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (FOG). Second, a comparison is done between the RFOG and several recently proposed coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW) gyroscopes. It is shown that the relationship between loss and maximum rotation sensitivity is the same for both conventional and CROW gyroscopes. Thus, coupling multiple resonators together cannot enhance rotation sensitivity. While CROW gyroscopes offer the potential for large group indices, this increase of group index does not provide a corresponding increase in the maximum sensitivity to rotation. For a given footprint and a given total loss, the highest sensitivity is shown to be achieved either in a conventional RFOG utilizing a single resonator, or a conventional FOG.

    3. The spectroscopic and energy transfer characteristics of the rare earth ions used for silicate glass fibre lasers operating in the shortwave infrared (pages 466–482)

      S.D. Jackson

      Version of Record online: 9 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810058

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The continuing growth in the research and development of high power diode-pumped fibre lasers relates to the exceptional thermal management provided by the extended geometry of the fibre and the small quantum defect associated with the 1 μm emitting Yb3+ ion. Lengthening the emission wavelength of diode-pumped fibre lasers further into the infrared is important for many applications ranging from medicine to defence; however, extending the emission wavelength remains a challenge. This review will examine in detail the spectroscopy and the energy transfer processes that impact Tm3+-doped and Ho3+-doped silicate glasses that are used for fibre lasers in the 1.9 μm to 2.1 μm region of the shortwave infrared spectrum. We will explore a number of important applications that function in the shortwave infrared region that will benefit from using these light sources and I will suggest the reasons for choosing silicate glass over other glasses as the host material for this wavelength range.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION